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Potassium

Why is
Potassium Mineral
this medication prescribed?
Potassium is essential for the proper functioning of the heart, kidneys, muscles, nerves, and digestive system. Usually the food you eat supplies all of the potassium you need. However, certain diseases (e.g., kidney disease and gastrointestinal disease with vomiting and diarrhea) and drugs, especially diuretics ('water pills'), remove potassium from the body. Potassium supplements are taken to replace potassium losses and prevent potassium deficiency.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

How should this medicine be used?
Potassium comes in oral liquid, powder, granules, effervescent tablets, regular tablets, extended-release (long-acting) tablets, and extended-release capsules. It usually is taken two to four times a day, with or immediately after meals. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take potassium exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Take all forms of potassium with a full glass of water or fruit juice.

Add the liquid to water. Dissolve the powder, granules, or effervescent tablets in cold water or fruit juice according to the manufacturer's directions or the directions on your prescription label; mix the drug well just before you take it. Cold liquids help mask the unpleasant taste.

Swallow extended-release tablets and capsules whole. Do not chew them or dissolve them in your mouth.

What special precautions should I follow?
Before taking potassium,

tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to potassium or any other drugs.
tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec),and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril); diuretics ('water pills'); and vitamins. Do not take potassium if you are taking amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), or triamterene (Dyrenium).
tell your doctor if you have or have ever had heart, kidney, or Addison's (adrenal gland) disease.
tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking potassium, call your doctor.
if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking potassium.
What special dietary instructions should I follow?
If you are using a salt substitute, tell your doctor. Many salt substitutes contain potassium. Your doctor will consider this source in determining your dose of potassium supplement. Your doctor may advise you to use a potassium-containing salt substitute and to eat potassium-rich foods (e.g., bananas, prunes, raisins, and milk).

What should I do if I forget a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it and take any remaining doses for that day at evenly spaced intervals. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?
Although side effects from potassium are not common, they can occur. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

upset stomach
vomiting
diarrhea
If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

mental confusion
listlessness
tingling, prickling, burning, tight, or pulling sensation of arms, hands, legs, or feet
heaviness or weakness of legs
cold, pale, gray skin
stomach pain
unusual stomach bulging
black stools
What storage conditions are needed for this medicine?
Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose
In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What other information should I know?Return to top
Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to potassium. You may have electrocardiograms (EKGs) and blood tests to see if your dose needs to be changed.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

Brand names
Glu-K
K+ 10
K+ 8
K+ Care
K+ Care Effervescent Tablets
Kaochlor 10%
Kaon Elixir
Kaon-Cl 20% Elixir
Kaon-Cl-10
Kay Ciel
K-Dur 10
K-Dur 20
K-Lor
Klor-Con 10
Klor-Con 8
Klor-Con Powder
Klor-Con/25 Powder
Klor-Con/EF
Klotrix
K-Lyte/CL 50 Effervescent Tablets
K-Lyte/CL Effervescent Tablets
K-Lyte DS Effervescent Tablets
K-Lyte Effervescent Tablets
K-Tab Filmtab
Micro-K
Potassium Acetate Injection MaxiVial
Quic-K
Rum-K
Slow-K
Tri-K
Twin-K


Other names
KCl



Other useful Minerals information: Manganese | Magnesium | Molybdenum

Page Content: low potassium , potassium chloride , food high in potassium , potassium food , potassium nitrate , potassium deficiency , high potassium , potassium rich food , symptom of low potassium , potassium permanganate .

 

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